One Heart Stories

The Mediterranean diet shouldn't be Greek to your heart

The Mediterranean diet shouldn't be Greek to your heart

 by 

Following the Mediterranean diet is heart-healthy. But what does that mean? A dietitian from UT Southwestern Medical Center explains.

Answering your questions on heart health

Answering your questions on heart health

 by 

It was my pleasure to answer your questions about women’s heart health during the social media live chat on Feb. 18, 2015, as part of UT Southwestern’s Heart Month activities.

Broken heart syndrome is mysterious, but real

Broken heart syndrome is mysterious, but real

 by 

The mysterious condition is real and on the rise in the Dallas area.

Complications during pregnancy can predict future heart disease risk

Complications during pregnancy can predict future heart disease risk

 by 

What a woman experiences during pregnancy can give doctors a glimpse into the future.

Answering questions about women's heart health

Answering questions about women's heart health

 by 

A UT Southwestern physician will answer questions about women’s heart health, heart attacks, and chest pain during an upcoming live chat.

How much calcium is too much?

How much calcium is too much?

 by 

The right amount builds strong bones, but too much calcium may lead to heart problems.

Could diabetes define the future of heart disease?

Could diabetes define the future of heart disease?

 by 

Dr. Joseph Hill explains how diabetes affects the heart.

Make time for breakfast – the day’s most important meal

Make time for breakfast – the day’s most important meal

 by 

A UT Southwestern dietitian provides tips for ensuring you don't skip breakfast.

Low-carb vs. low-fat and other things to remember when dieting

Low-carb vs. low-fat and other things to remember when dieting

 by 

if you limit carbohydrates, what are you replacing them with makes all the difference.

Why belly fat is dangerous and how to control it

Why belly fat is dangerous and how to control it

 by 

Obesity is a major issue in the United States, but the latest research suggests we may need to change the way we look at fat.