Cancer Stories

Incubating Progress: SABR/Lung Cancer

Incubating Progress: SABR/Lung Cancer

 

UT Southwestern is helping redefine lung cancer care through innovations in stereotactic body radiation therapy.

Incubating Progress: Imaging/Brain Cancer

Incubating Progress: Imaging/Brain Cancer

 

Nearly one-third of brain tumors are gliomas. These tumors can lie dormant for months or years, then suddenly start growing rapidly in a deadly form called glioblastoma.

Incubating Progress: PROSPR/Colon Cancer

Incubating Progress: PROSPR/Colon Cancer

 

The Cancer Center tackles the complex challenge of boosting colon cancer screening among minorities and underserved populations.

Director's Message

Director's Message

 

For cancer care in North Texas, 2005-2015 has been a defining decade. Ten years ago, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center set the loftiest of goals

Incubating Progress: HIF2/Kidney Cancer

Incubating Progress: HIF2/Kidney Cancer

 

Under normal conditions, hypoxia-inducible factors, or HIFs, allow the body’s cells to thrive in low-oxygen environments, such as high altitudes.

Outreach

Outreach

 

Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center serves urban, suburban, and rural populations throughout the 12 counties that make up the nearly 7 million-resident Dallas/Fort Worth metropolitan area.

Scientific Programs

 

To conduct studies at the intersection of developmental biology and cancer biology in living animals.

The Decade Ahead

The Decade Ahead

 

Important advances over the next decade will help Simmons Cancer Center realize the power and the promise of precision medicine for North Texas cancer patients.

Processed meat and cancer: What’s the real risk?

Processed meat and cancer: What’s the real risk?

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This fall, WHO stated that processed meats might cause cancer. How do hot dogs and bacon stack up against other cancer risks?

Cancer and the holidays: Talk it out or stay silent?

Cancer and the holidays: Talk it out or stay silent?

 

The holidays are a time of love and cheer, but can be difficult for families of cancer patients. These tips can make talking about treatment a bit easier.