Apheresis

Apheresis is a nonsurgical treatment in which a component of blood, such as plasma or red blood cells, can be removed, collected, or replaced. The therapeutic apheresis program at UT Southwestern is recognized as one of the most prominent of its kind, providing quality-of-life therapies to the Dallas/Fort Worth community and beyond.

The types of apheresis procedures performed at UT Southwestern include:

How Apheresis is Performed

Prior to the apheresis procedure, an evaluation of the veins in the arms is performed by our staff. If the veins are suitable, intravenous catheters will be inserted at the time of each procedure in order to draw blood into the apheresis machine. If the veins are fragile or too small, then an in dwelling port or tunneled dialysis catheter will be placed. During this visit a consultation will be done with an apheresis physician.

Once intravenous access is obtained, blood is drawn into an apheresis machine. The machine uses a centrifuge to separate the blood into its components: red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, and plasma. The treatment will remove and/or treat one of these components depending on the type of procedure being performed.

Apheresis at UT Southwestern

Our apheresis team is made up of dedicated physicians, physician assistants, and nurses.

The apheresis program at UT Southwestern offers both inpatient and outpatient services, 7 days a week. We have a dedicated team of physicians, physician assistants, registered nurses, certified apheresis technicians, and medical assistants providing cutting-edge care, while upholding our institution’s mission of delivering the highest level of quality, safety, and service. Our program is led by Ravi Sarode, M.D., former president of the American Society for Apheresis and Co-Editor-in-Chief of the medical journal, Transfusion and Apheresis Science. In addition to focusing on quality patient care, our program is dedicated to conducting research to further the knowledge in the field of apheresis.